Courses

The program requires a minimum of 124 credit hours. All students are required to complete specific coursework. This list should only be used as a curriculum guide. Course listings and required curriculum are subject to change. 

Included within this list is the Educated Citizen Core Curriculum. All students seeking to complete an undergraduate degree at Nebraska Methodist College must complete this set of Arts & Sciences requirements.

 

Arts & Sciences Curriculum

COM 101

ENGLISH COMPOSITION

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This course provides instruction and practice in writing, with emphasis on the recursive processes of generating, drafting, revising and editing. Students develop skills in producing and evaluating written communications in private and public contexts.

  • Credits: 3.0

COM 230/245

LANGUAGE & CULTURE IN HEALTHCARE

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COM 230        SPANISH
COM 245        SIGN LANGUAGE

Access to healthcare is greatly affected by one's command of language.  Students in this course engage in the exploration of language and culture then apply these concepts to the healthcare environment through service-learning and community engagement.  Students develop practical communication skills that enable effective cross-cultural work with health professionals and clients with backgrounds different from their own.

  • Credits: 3.0

HUM 150

THE WORLD OF IDEAS: CRITICAL REASONING AND RHETORIC

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There is a strong relationship between thinking clearly and expressing thoughts in formal writing and public speaking.  Using the skills of logic and critical thinking, students will examine ideas, analyze and evaluate the arguments of others, and advocate for their own ideas.  Students will be introduced to the NMC Portfolio process.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites:

    HUM 150 is to be taken in the first semester, unless designated in the second semester by the program of study

HUM 210/213

HUMANITIES ELECTIVE

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Students must choose to take either:

HUM 210 INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS
Introduction to Ethics introduces students to theories and practices of individual, communal and societal obligations.  Moral inquiry in the course proceeds from a philosophical basis.

HUM 213 INTERDISCIPLINARY HEALTHCARE ETHICS
This course introduces students to theories and practices of individual, communal and societal obligations. Moral inquiry in the course proceeds from a philosophical basis, with an emphasis on varied professional codes of ethics in healthcare disciplines. Students will explore codes of ethics and how they relate to traditional Western philosophies.

  • Credits: 3.0

HUM ---

THE WORLD OF IDEAS: HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

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Students critically analyze the impact of history on contemporary society.  Historical methods of inquiry inform students' perspectives on societal and institutional development. Courses include:

HUM 255        HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

This survey history course facilitates exploration of the history of Western Civilization from ancient times through the age of European exploration utilizing archaeology, works of fiction, news media, and secondary sources. The course provides opportunities for students to (1) employ creative means of exploring history, (2) become familiar with basic research skills and (3) hone creative and scholarly writing skills.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: Determined by major.

HUM 256        THE HISTORY OF WESTERN MEDICINE

This survey course examines the history of the dominant form of medicine in the world: that which developed in Western Europe and America between 500 B.C.E. and the twentieth century. Among the various sciences, medicine stands apart. In its modern form, it is both science and art. The study of the history of medicine is more than a mere background to contemporary science: it serves as a platform for understanding how past cultures saw themselves and their place in the world. The history of medicine reflects changing cultural understandings of the world and the place of humanity within it. Medicine, or medical history, can also have a profound effect upon what we believe about nature and ourselves, influencing our art, literature, and philosophy. The majority of this course will deal with medical trends, treatments, and perspectives. These can strike us as both amusing and disturbing, but their greatest value lies in their power to prompt us to reexamine our own beliefs and assumptions.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: Determined by major.

HUM 257        U.S. HISTORY: PAST, PRESENT, AND PROMISE: A SEARCH FOR THE TRUTH BY CHALLENGING    

                         THE PRESENT & DEMANDING A NEW FUTURE

Students in this survey course will explore the history of the United States from the first inhabitants of North America to 1870.  From these historical roots the course will explore 20th century conflicts including the current war in Afghanistan. Even though it will follow a political chronology it will focus on history as a dynamic process shaped by human expectations, difficult choices, and often surprising consequences. It will concentrate on the following themes: Global Relations, Constitutional Heritage, Citizenship and Democracy, Cultural and Geographic Diversity, and Social, Technological, and Economic Development. It will encourage students to think historically, to be reflective individuals, and to be active citizens seeking the truth as agents of change.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: Determined by major.

HUM 258        WORLD HISTORY TO 1800

Students examine the formation of selected world civilizations up to the 18th century and relate challenges of those civilizations to the challenges humans face in the 21st century global community.  We examine how civilizations are formed and analyze forces that caused them to decline and transform.  We look at both the large picture of civilizations in an overview, and we examine lives of individuals who made significant impacts on their society and its future.  Historical methods of inquiry, including study of maps, artifacts, primary texts, and critical evaluations of secondary source interpretation, inform students' perspectives on societal and institutional development.  Most of all, this course provides students with opportunities to make personal connections with experiences of individuals in the past.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: Determined by major.

HUM 259        HISTORY OF SCIENCE: THE CREATION OF A BIOMEDICAL WORLD

This is a course on the history of science, with an emphasis on the development of modern views toward biology, medicine, and how they have affected our views of human nature. In this course students will practice basic and advanced historical skills, and a large amount of in-class time will be spent on discussing and practicing the techniques that historians use to investigate and understand our world. Most of our time, we will explore the following questions: How and why have humans attempted to learn about the natural world, attempted to do science and medicine? How and why have those attempts changed over time? How have discoveries in science and medicine changed our social, cultural, and religious values? How have our social, cultural, and religious values changed our study of science and medicine?

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: Determined by major.
  • Credits:

HUM ---

WORLD OF IDEAS: HUMANITIES ELECTIVES

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Students may choose two (2) World of Ideas elective courses. The courses must each be categorized within one of the three sections below. At least one of the two electives must be in the Arts or Human Connection.

  • The World of Ideas: Human Connection
  • The World of Ideas: Historical Perspectives
  • The World of Ideas: The Arts

See All Humanities Course Descriptions for specific course information.

  • Credits: 6.0

SCI 200

HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY: PRINCIPLES & PRACTICE

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Structure and function of the cell, and the nervous, skeletal, muscle systems, special senses; circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, endocrine, reproductive systems, as well as necessary aspects of chemistry, physics, embryology, and histology are stressed in this course. Laboratory experience will include cadaver study.

  • Credits: 5.0

SCI 206

PATHOPHYSIOLOGY/PHARMACOLOGY

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This survey course begins with a major focus on cellular function and pathology, including inflammation, infection, immune response, metabolism, and fluid disequilibria. These concepts serve as the foundation for the course as alterations in various bodily functions are examined. Alterations in body fluid and electrolyte homeostasis; fluid acid/base balance; gastrointestinal, urinary, respiratory, cardiac, endocrine and neurological functions are emphasized. The student will be introduced to pharmacological principles of commonly used classes of medications. The various drug classifications and general characteristics of drugs within a class are examined. These characteristics include the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, side effects, adverse effects and drug interactions of common drugs within each class.

  • Credits: 4.0
  • Prerequisites: SCI 200

SSC 101/215

PSYCHOLOGY ELECTIVE

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SSC 101: INTRO TO PYSCHOLOGY

This course is designed to merge science with a broad human perspective and to engage both the mind and the heart. It sets forth the principles and processes of psychology and is sensitive to student's needs and interests. It helps students gain insight into the important phenomena in everyday life, to feel a sense of wonder about seemingly ordinary human processes and to see how psychology addresses issues that cross disciplines.

SSC 215 : LIFE-SPAN PSYCHOLOGY

The Life-Span perspective involves several basic contentions: development is life-long, multidimensional, multi-directional, plastic, historically embedded, multi-disciplinary and contextual. Three imperative developmental issues are explored: maturation and experience, continuity and discontinuity and stability and change. Students study how humans develop and how they become who they are.

  • Credits: 3.0

SSC 235

THE SOCIOLOGY OF CULTURE

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This course explores the ways in which human beings make and remake the meaning of their social world through the production of culture. It employs sociological methods to explore the construction of the dominant, white subculture in the United States. The same methodologies are employed to examine the construction of subcultures in the United States, including those based on race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation.

  • Credits: 3.0

SSC 465

CAPSTONE: THE EDUCATED CITIZEN

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This course is based in the social sciences and is designed to assist students in the integration of their roles as healthcare professionals and educated citizens. The focus of the class is on deepening students’ understanding of and facility with social and political systems that impact the health and wellbeing of the community.  Students demonstrate their preparation to act as educated citizens through the presentation of their portfolio within the context of this capstone course.

  • Credits: 3.0

SCI 105

ALGEBRA

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This course is designed for students who need to review basic algebra skills. It covers topics including positive and negative real numbers, solving linear equations and their applications, integer exponents, operations with polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, graphing and equations of lines.

  • Credits: 3.0

SCI 110

INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS

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This course discusses the major fundamental themes in classical physics of mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, magnetism, light and modern physics. Includes a laboratory.

  • Credits: 3.0

SCI 116

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

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This course will introduce students to terminology used in the healthcare professions. The origins of medical terms will be studied with an emphasis placed on understanding the suffixes, prefixes, combining forms and root words used in healthcare terminology. At the end of the course the student will be able to comfortably understand, translate and discuss issues related to their profession using appropriate terminology.

  • Credits: 1.0

DMS Professional Courses

DMS ---

DMS Professional Courses

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Four-year traditional students enrolled in the Diagnostic Medical Sonography bachelor's degree program are expected to take 57 credit hours of Diagnostic Medical Sonography courses in order to first attain an Associate's degree. For a full list of these courses, please click here.

NOTE: This DOES NOT apply to students who already have an Associate's degree, are ARDMS or RT registered and are enrolled in the DMS bachelor's degree completion option.

  • Credits: 57.0

DMS Bachelor's Core Curriculum

COM 320

HEALTHCARE COLLABORATION & LEADERSHIP

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This course applies leadership and management theories to the changing environment of healthcare. Students synthesize their knowledge of such topics as emotional intelligence, assertiveness, conflict management, gender dynamics, feedback delivery and systems theory in advanced writing and speaking projects. The NMC portfolio is integrated throughout this course. A complete portfolio (Levels I-III) is due by the end of the course.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: Determined by major

HCA 465

SURVEY OF US HEALTHCARE SYSTEMS

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Healthcare professionals need to have an understanding of the interaction of U.S. healthcare policies and public health science to be able to act as change agents in their professions.  How do health professionals access this information, analyze and react in ways that will improve the health and wellness of their patients?  This course will inform and ask the student to respond to the dynamic area of U.S. healthcare systems

  • Credits: 3.0

SSC 325

APPLIED ANALYSIS OF RESEARCH

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Evidence-based practice is an important component of effective clinical management. This course allows students to develop skills in applied statistics and research while learning to critically examine healthcare information from a variety of sources, including but not limited to professional journals, governmental reports and public media.

  • Credits: 3.0

WMI 326

BEREAVEMENT AND LOSS FOR THE WOMEN'S HEALTH PROFESSIONAL

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This is a specialized course in the study of grief and bereavement for healthcare professionals focusing specifically on women's health. Students will gain insight to their own personal losses and how this impacts their professional practice. Topics include experiences of grief across the lifespan, cultures, gender and spiritual differences. Students will also learn about how they can support those grieving through verbal, non-verbal communication and creating memories. Students will be able to identify local and national resources they can share with their patients. Finally, students will reflect on self-care strategies to help reduce burn out.

  • Credits: 3.0

WMI 415

REPRODUCTIVE GENETICS

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This course explores the discipline of reproductive genetics, which commences in the preconception period. Human reproduction and new reproductive technologies are covered with a focus on the prenatal timeframe. Emphasis is placed on the practical application of this knowledge in prenatal genetic screening and diagnosis, management, and therapy. Students will also be exposed to preconceptional screening options, evaluation of abnormal findings in the newborn, stillbirth and recurrent pregnancy loss, and adult onset hereditary conditions impacting fertility.

  • Credits: 3.0

WMI 423

TOPICS IN INFANT, ADOLESCENT AND WOMEN'S HEALTH

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This course provides students the opportunity to become informed, aware citizens understanding human issues related to end-of-life decision making, dying, and experiencing grief and loss. Topics focus on death and grief across the lifespan; the role of death in American culture; understanding individual and family challenges with decision making at the end of life; and the experience of grieving across life stages, cultures, gender, and spiritual difference. Students will gain insight into their own values and beliefs in this area, as well as understanding the needs of terminally ill people, those who need support in their grief and mourning, and persons dealing with challenging life and death decisions regarding self or loved ones.

  • Credits: 3.0

Elective Courses (Choose One)

DMS 311

FETAL ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY

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This course serves as an introduction to the ultrasonographic cross-sectional anatomy and physiology of the fetal cardiac and circulatory system, with emphasis on recognition of the appearance of normal fetal cardiac anatomy, and cardiac pathology or defects via sonographic images and clips, knowledge of differential diagnosis of various fetal cardiac pathology, and general understanding of clinic protocols and standards regarding cardiac imaging.

  • Credits: 3.0

DMS 315

NEUROSONOGRAPHY

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This course utilizes lecture materials, readings, interactive learning activities, assignments and exams to gain a working knowledge of neurosonography to include gross anatomy, physiology, sonographic imaging and interpretation of the neonatal brain.

  • Credits: 3.0

DMS 320

PEDIATRIC SONOGRAPHY

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In this course, students will gain a working knowledge of pediatric sonography to include anatomy, physiology, and sonographic imaging in the pediatric patient.

  • Credits: 3.0