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BSN to DNP - Family Nurse Practitioner

Have Questions? Speak to an Admissions Coordinator

BSN to DNP - Family Nurse Practitioner Program Perks

  • Curriculum integrates scientific knowledge, nursing practice, and concepts.
  • Program concludes with the nurse completing an evidence-based capstone project centered on the application and assessment of a healthcare topic in a community or patient practice.
  • Our faculty bring broad experiences in advanced clinical practice, leadership and education.
  • Graduates will be well equipped to develop, implement, assess and advance new practice approaches for healthcare delivery.
  • Graduates are eligible to sit for certification as a family nurse practitioner (FNP).

In a remarkable sign of progress, patients across the nation now entrust their primary care to Family Nurse Practitioners. Join the ranks of this thriving field by pursuing your Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) at Nebraska Methodist College.

As a nurse with a terminal degree signifying the height of your profession, you'll be uniquely qualified to translate your years of experience into holistic healthcare treatment with an emphasis on provider-patient interaction.

Your compassion as a nurse is what will make you the preferred choice among families seeking something more from their healthcare experience. As a Family Nurse Practitioner, you'll offer exceptional care to the patient, prescribing medications and treatment options suited to each unique situation.

More and more states, including Nebraska, are granting Full Practice Authority to Nurse Practitioners, which means they can operate their own clinics and assist patients to the full extent of their certification as an NP.

A nurse in the DNP program is prepared with the knowledge, skills and clinical experiences necessary to diagnose and treat individuals across their lifespans, providing ambulatory care within an outpatient clinic in both urban and rural settings.

The BSN to DNP program requires a nurse to complete a total of 75 credit hours. Of this, 57 credit hours can be obtained via synchronous and asynchronous online learning and 18 credit hours (1,080 contact hours) are devoted to clinical practice. Clinical practice requirements are completed in a preceptor experience.

A full-time student in the DNP program can graduate in 36 months; a part-time student can finish in four to five years.

Salaries for Nurse Practitioners vary widely in the U.S. and are based upon many factors including geography, job description, specialty and experience. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median salary in May 2015 for Nurse Practitioners in the United States was $98,190 per year ($47.21 per hour), with a much faster than average projected job growth of 35 percent between 2014 and 2024.

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Accreditation

The Doctor of Nursing Practice program at Nebraska Methodist College is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) http://www.ccneaccreditation.org

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Costs & Financial Aid

Attending Nebraska Methodist College represents a major investment in your future. For most students, attending college takes planning and sacrifice. NMC recognizes this and is committed to helping you find every avenue to finance your education. View the Tuition by Program & Degree page for a comprehensive list of all Doctor of Nursing Practice fees.

NMC encourages students to apply for all types of assistance for which they are qualified.  Potential resources for this program include:

Nurse Faculty Loan Program

Aimed at increasing the number of qualified nurse faculty, NFLP loans cover the cost of tuition, fees and books for part-time or full-time enrollment.

Following completion of the advanced education program, up to 85% of the loan may be cancelled if the borrower works as a full-time nurse faculty for a prescribed period of time.

Student Loans 

Visit our Financial Aid page to learn more about what's available and how to apply.

Employee Education Benefits

Contact your organization's human resources office to find out what's available.

Employees of Methodist Health System can find details on the MHS Intranet.  Under Human Resources select either MHS Benefits or MJE Benefits then scroll down to Pursuing Your Dreams.

External Scholarships

Visit our Scholarships page to learn more.

Financial Aid
Cost Per Credit Hour $793

Admissions

Criteria
  • Minimum of a bachelor's degree in nursing (BSN) from a program accredited by CCNE, ACEN, NLNAC or NLN CNEA. 
  • A grade point average (GPA) ≥ 3.0 on a 4.0 scale in bachelor's nursing program.
  • Undergraduate completion of the following courses:
    • Statistics
    • Undergraduate health assessment
    • Research
    • Anatomy and physiology
    • Undergraduate pharmacology
    • Microbiology
    • Chemistry
    • Community nursing
    • Pathophysiology
  • Current unencumbered Registered Nurse licensure at time of application or licensure must be obtained by May 15th of the program start year. Practice as a RN is encouraged but not required. 
  • Fulfillment of the technical standards
  • Non-Nebraska Residents meet State Authorization
  • No GRE required for admission 
Deadlines

Applications will be accepted and reviewed on a rolling basis following the priority deadline.

It benefits applicants to complete their application as close to the priority deadline as possible as more seats are available. 

Requirements

To be considered for admission the following items must be submitted to the Admissions Office prior to the application date:

  • NursingCAS Application
  • Resume or curriculum vitae (CV)
  • Written statement
  • Official college transcripts from graduating institutions and official transcripts confirming completion of the required undergraduate courses
  • Interview with two NMC nursing faculty members using a standardized interview process and scoring method

Starting Term

Standard Deadline

Priority Deadline

  • August
  • Rolling until cohort is full

Curriculum

All students are required to complete specific coursework. This list below should only be used as a curriculum guide. Course listings and required curriculum are subject to change. View course descriptions below.

NRS 686
RURAL NURSING
3 credit hours
This course analyzes the major concepts of public health and health determinants in rural communities. Theories and models of rural nursing will be examined to provide a broad understanding of the characteristics of healthcare in rural settings. Concepts explored throughout the course enhance the competence of nurse leaders and educators to address the challenges and develop the opportunities of nursing in a rural setting.

NRS 690
COMMUNITY HEALTH PROGRAM PLANNING
3 credit hours
This course is designed to assist the advanced practice nurse in developing, implementing, and evaluating health programs at the individual level and the population or community level. Using public health theory as a basis, content will focus on targeting diverse populations, determinants of health problems and strategies to address these health problems.

NRS 694
TEACHING, LEARNING & INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS
3 credit hours
This course provides the foundation in educational principles for the student. Learning theories and best practices provide the basis for analyzing the concept of learning in the cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains. Teaching strategies to facilitate student learning in the classroom, clinical, practice and online environment are examined. Legal, ethical and professional faculty responsibilities in higher education are explored. (Cross-listed with EDD 694)

NRS 698
CURRICULUM PLANNING & EVALUATION
3 credit hours
This course focuses on curriculum planning, design, implementation and evaluation. The concept of curriculum will be explored at the individual course level and at the program level. Best practices in education will be incorporated into curriculum design. The influence of regulatory and accrediting bodies on the curriculum will be examined. (Cross-listed with EDD 694)

NRS 780
ADVANCED PUBLIC HEALTH
3 credit hours
This course lays the framework for the advanced public health nurse role with an emphasis on public health policy. This course explores conceptual models and frameworks to examine complex public health issues, systems, policies, and practice. Students evaluate community issues and integrate clinical health practices emphasizing a health promotion and prevention approach while addressing health disparities of vulnerable and diverse populations.

NRS 784
PUBLIC HEALTH ETHICS
3 credit hours
This course provides a foundation for a systematic process to clarify, prioritize, and justify ethical principles and values that guide public health action. Students will compare and contrast public health ethics to bioethics and medical ethics that guide biology and clinical medicine which are individual or patient centered. Throughout this course students will distinguish public health ethics as a population-based approach to public health as a field of study.

NRS 788
CIVIC HEALTH
3 credit hours
This course uses the Culture of Health framework to examine the role of civic health in the health and wellbeing of individuals and communities. Students will examine civic health indicators (i.e. volunteering and giving, group membership, trust in institutions, social interactions, neighbor connectedness, voting and registration, and political involvement) in relation to population-based care, health policy, ethics, and finance. Examination of social change leadership, analysis of civic-related research, and exploration of civic identity will further student civic and public purpose as a healthcare professional and educated citizen.

HPM 660
LIFESTYLE MEDICINE & HEALTH BEHAVIOR THEORIES
3 credit hours
This course examines evidence-based lifestyle medicine recommendations and interventions to prevent, treat, and possibly reverse chronic diseases. Students analyze the key components of health behavior change theories and their application in research and practice in support of adopting healthy behaviors. Students will apply motivational interviewing techniques to assist clients/patients in strengthening motivation and readiness to change. Recommendations and interventions focus on nutrition, exercise, stress management, sleep, tobacco & alcohol addictions, and healthy relationships.

NRS 700
PROGRAM ORIENTATION
0 credit hours
This course provides the doctoral program orientation for Nebraska Methodist College. Emphasis will be placed on program delivery modalities, resource utilization, and scholarly writing. Students must complete this course on campus. (Cross-listed with EDD 700)

Prerequisites: Admission to DNP program.

NRS 706
SUMMER INTENSIVE
1 credit hours
This course serves to verify foundational course proficiency in relation to advanced health assessment skills and incorporation of pharmacotherapeutic and pathophysiological principles. Simulation and case studies will serve as the basis for proficiency evaluation. Students must complete this course on campus.

Prerequisites: NRS 712, NRS 716, NRS 720

NRS 712
ADVANCED HEALTH ASSESSMENT
3 credit hours / 60 clinical hours
This foundational course provides the theoretical and clinical assessment skills essential for advanced nursing practice. Comprehensive history taking and holistic assessment necessary to differentiate normal from abnormal findings and potential diagnosis will be emphasized. Case study analysis and application in the clinical setting provides the basis for interpretation of diagnostic findings for individuals and families in the ambulatory and acute care setting.

NRS 716
ADVANCED PATHOPHYSIOLOGY
4 credit hours
This course is designed to present an orientation to disease as disordered physiology. It is intended to enable advanced practice registered nurse students to understand how and why the symptoms and signs of various conditions appear. In doing so, it recognizes the practitioner's need to understand the mechanism(s) underlying the disease and clinical manifestations of human responses to actual or potential health alterations across the lifespan. This course serves as one of the main components for clinical assessment, decision-making and management of patients.

NRS 720
ADVANCED PHARMACOLOGY
3 credit hours
This course provides a foundation for in-depth analysis of clinical pharmacology. The pharmacotherapeutic effects and clinical uses of specific drug groups related to the care and management of patients in primary and acute care settings will be examined. Pharmacological principles, mechanisms of action, associated drug interactions, and patient education aspects of drug therapy are discussed as a basis for clinical judgments in primary and acute care. Problems inherent in drug therapy of specific patient populations, such as ethnic groups, children, pregnant or lactating women and elders are emphasized as is the genetic basis of pharmacotherapy. The ethical, legal and economic implications surrounding the Advanced Practice Registered Nurse's (APRN) role in prescribing and monitoring pharmacotherapies will also be studied.

NRS 738
THEORY FOUNDATION
3 credit hours
The development and meaning of theories relevant to nursing practice will be examined. Theory development, evaluation, and application will be analyzed in relationship to the advancement of nursing practice through scientific and clinical inquiry, which leads to evidence-based practice.

NRS 742
RESEARCH
3 credit hours
This course provides an in-depth study of the design and conduct of healthcare research with emphasis on identifying researchable clinical, educational, and healthcare delivery problems. Analysis and interpretation of data from qualitative and quantitative research designs will be emphasized. Students will begin to investigate and develop their capstone question and complete a systematic literature review to support the capstone project. (Cross-listed with EDD 742)

Prerequisites: Graduate Statistics

NRS 746
ROLE DEVELOPMENT OF APRN
2 credit hours
This course examines the theoretical principles that guide practice of the Advanced Practice Nurse (APRN). Emphasis will be placed on the roles of the APRN which include clinician, clinical leader, and educator.

NRS 750
HEALTHCARE FINANCE
3 credit hours
This course provides the basics of economic theory, market drivers and restraints, healthcare finance and reimbursement, cost/benefit analysis and healthcare innovation. The financial environment of healthcare and how it impacts healthcare providers and leaders is examined. The relationship between healthcare economics, health policy, program development and clinical practice is explored. (Cross-listed with EDD 750, MBH 670)

NRS 754
HEALTHCARE POLICY
3 credit hours
This course provides a foundation for analyzing the social and political forces that influence healthcare policy decisions. The relationship between health policy, social justice, and practice will be explored. Students will examine current healthcare policy and factors which influence policy development. The healthcare policy will be investigated. (Cross-listed with EDD 754, MBH 660)

NRS 758
HEALTH SYSTEMS, INFORMATICS & LEADERSHIP
3 credit hours
This course provides an overview of contemporary healthcare systems and organizations. Within this overview the research, health policy, regulation, and law are examined from the perspective of how these factors shape healthcare organizations. Available technology tools to interpret and organize health data is investigated in relation to health system productivity. This course synthesizes leadership and system theory into understanding the healthcare industry and program development to become a leader in patient centered care and positive health outcomes. (Cross-listed with MBH 600)

NRS 802
ADULT NURSING THEORY I
3 credit hours
This course provides the theoretical foundation for clinical role development and skills required in primary care delivery for adults with common acute and chronic health problems. Interviewing skills and a methodical comprehensive approach needed to formulate differential diagnoses are emphasized. This course encourages the development and implementation of an evidence-based client management plan based on advanced health and health promotion competencies. This course promotes a holistic approach incorporating health assessment, clinical and diagnostic reasoning, and pathophysiological and phamacotherapeutic principles.

Prerequisites: NRS 706, NRS 712, NRS 716, NRS 720, NRS 746

NRS 806
PRACTICUM I
3 credit hours / 180 clinical hours
This course provides clinical experience in providing care for individuals across the life span with common acute and chronic health problems in an ambulatory care setting. Attention will be given to clinical role development and skills required in care delivery for primary care of individuals across the life span. Interviewing skills and a methodical comprehensive approach needed to formulate differential diagnoses are emphasized. Clinical expectations include the development and implementation of an evidence-based client management plan that addresses the client holistically with an emphasis on health promotion.

Prerequisites: NRS 706, NRS 802

NRS 812
ADULT NURSING THEORY II
3 credit hours
This course provides the theoretical foundation for clinical role development and skills required in primary care delivery adults with common acute and chronic health problems. Interviewing skills and a methodical comprehensive approach needed to formulate differential diagnoses are emphasized. This course encourages the development and implementation of an evidence-based client management plan based on advanced health and health promotion competencies. This course promotes a holistic approach incorporating health assessment, clinical and diagnostic reasoning, and pathophysiological and phamacotherapeutic principles.

Prerequisites: NRS 802

NRS 816
PRACTICUM II
3 credit hours / 180 clinical hours
This course provides clinical experience in providing care for individuals across the life span with common acute and chronic health problems in an ambulatory care setting. Attention will be given to clinical role development and skills required in care delivery for primary care of individuals across the life span. Interviewing skills and a methodical comprehensive approach needed to formulate differential diagnoses are emphasized. Clinical expectations include the development and implementation of an evidence-based client management plan that addresses the client holistically with an emphasis on health promotion.

Prerequisites: NRS 806, NRS 812, NRS 822

NRS 822
MATERNAL AND CHILDREN NURSING THEORY
3 credit hours
This course provides the theoretical foundation for clinical role development and skills required in care delivery for primary care of infants, children, adolescents, and child-bearing women with common acute and chronic health problems. Application of theories and advanced nursing strategies in health promotion will be emphasized. This course provides the foundation for providing primary healthcare for the identified population and their families.

Prerequisites: NRS 802

NRS 826
PRACTICUM III
3 credit hours
This course provides the foundation for clinical role development and skills required in care delivery for primary care individuals across the lifespan with common acute and chronic health problems. Clinical application of knowledge necessary to provide care for this population will include the advanced practice nurse role in health promotion, disease prevention, and management of stable health problems. Health assessment, clinical and diagnostic reasoning, and pathophysiological and phamacotherapeutic principles will be incorporated to provide evidence-based care to this population.

Prerequisites: NRS 812, NRS 816, NRS 822

NRS 832
POPULATION HEALTH
3 credit hours / 180 clinical hours
This course provides the theoretical foundation for role development and skills required to identify health needs at a population level and strategies to improve population outcomes. The course focus is on translational research and the application of evidence-based concepts essential to the advancement of population based health. Analysis of the impact of social, cultural, and ecological systems across various populations will be emphasized throughout the course. A portion of this course requires on-campus completion. (Cross-listed with EDD 832).

NRS 836
PRACTICUM IV
3 credit hours / 180 clinical hours
This course provides clinical experience in providing care for individuals across the lifespan with common and acute chronic health problems in the ambulatory care setting. Attention to comprehensive and holistic assessment, clinical management, therapeutic monitoring, and coordination of health promotion and healthcare is anticipated.

Prerequisites: NRS 826

NRS 840
RESIDENCY
3 credit hours / 180 clinical hours
This course is an advanced nursing practicum that provides an opportunity for the student to integrate and synthesize knowledge and skills acquired in doctoral course work. In consultation with their DNP faculty advisor, students will select an area of clinical practice relevant to career aspirations. This residency provides the culmination experience for developing clinical knowledge and skills that demonstrate essentials of doctoral education.

Prerequisites: Completion of all practicum courses within the DNP track

NRS 880
CAPSTONE I
1 credit hours
This is the first of a four-course series that provides an opportunity for the student to participate in the completion of a scholarly project proposal. The project will focus on a practice problem within a specific population and contribute to the advancement of nursing practice. Students examine the elements of a proposal and identify a practice problem of interest. Students will conduct a scholarly literature review related to a practice problem and critically appraise the evidence. Students will apply a theoretical framework as a foundation for a clinical project. (Cross-listed with EDD 880)

Prerequisites:SSC 730, SSC 734, NRS 742

NRS 882
CAPSTONE II
3 credit hours
This is the second of a four-course series that provides an opportunity for the student to participate in the completion of a scholarly project proposal. In collaboration with a faculty mentor, the student will examine the essentials of scientific writing through completion of a capstone project proposal and program implementation planning. (Cross-listed with EDD 882)

Prerequisites:NRS 880

NRS 886
CAPSTONE III
3 credit hours
This is the third of a four-course series that provides an opportunity for the student to participate in the completion of a scholarly project proposal. In collaboration with a faculty mentor, the student will refine and implement the capstone proposal. (Cross-listed with EDD 886)

Prerequisites: NRS 882

NRS 890
CAPSTONE IV
1 credit hours
This is the last of a four-course series that provides an opportunity for the DNP student to participate in the completion of a scholarly project proposal. This course will focus on translation and dissemination of capstone project findings. (Cross-listed with EDD 890)

Prerequisites:NRS 886

SSC 730
BIOSTATISTICS
3 credit hours
This course is designed to prepare the graduate student to understand and apply bio-statistical methods needed in the design and analysis of biomedical and public health investigations. The major topics to be covered include descriptive statistics, probability distributions, sampling distributions, inferences (point estimates and confidence intervals), hypotheses testing (one-sample tests, two-sample tests), Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), as well as simple linear regression and multiple regression analysis. The course emphasizes the application of statistical concepts to analyze research for best available evidence to support quality nursing practice. The course also provides students with hands-on experience in using statistical software (SPSS) to assist in making effective decisions.

SSC 734
EPIDEMIOLOGY
3 credit hours
This course engages students in a comprehensive study of the concepts of epidemiology in relation to nursing practice, public health, and health policy. Concepts of health, risk, disease causality, and strategies to reduce the incidence and prevalence of health problems will be examined.

Prerequisite OR Corequisite: SSC 730, or evidence of graduate-level statistics course

Meet the Faculty

Our nursing faculty are highly experienced and credentialed in their own fields, giving you constant real-world insight you can use.

Instructors here care as deeply about their students as they do about the subject matter, and it shows.

Meet the Faculty

DNP Program Outcomes

Graduates of the DNP program will:

  1. Organize practice utilizing theoretical and scientific underpinnings.
    • Integrate nursing science with multiple disciplines to positively influencing health status of individuals, groups, and populations.
    • Utilize a scientific and theoretical based approach to examine healthcare delivery systems for individuals, groups, and populations.
    • Examine care from a holistic perspective.
  2. Demonstrate organizational and systems leadership aimed at quality improvement and systems thinking.
    • Evaluate healthcare delivery systems effectiveness in minimizing health disparities and promoting excellence in practice.
    • Display political skills, systems thinking, and business insight in the development of programs to meeting current and future needs of patient populations.
    • Examine strategies for addressing legal and ethical dilemmas influencing patient care, health systems and healthcare delivery.
  3. Integrate clinical scholarship and analytical methods in the dissemination of evidence-based practice.
    • Demonstrate competence in knowledge application, translation of research in practice, evaluation of practice and dissemination of evidence-based practice findings.
    • Design, direct and evaluate quality improvement methodologies to promote patient-centered care that is safe, timely and effective.
    • Utilize information technology and research methods to identify gaps in practice, collect and analyze existing data and design and evaluate evidence-based interventions aimed at promoting quality outcomes.
  4. Evaluate information systems/technology and patient care technology for the improvement and transformation of healthcare.
    • Analyze programs that evaluate and monitor outcomes of care, care systems and quality improvement initiatives.
    • Apply ethical, legal and regulatory standards and principles in evaluating health information and electronic medical record systems.
  5. Appraise healthcare policy in relation to advocacy in healthcare.
    • Design and implement healthcare policies to positively influence healthcare practice.
    • Examine healthcare policy from the perspective of the consumer, nurse and other stakeholders.
    • Engage politically competent actions that promote social justice and equity in healthcare.
  6. Demonstrate interprofessional collaboration for improving patient and population health outcomes
    • Demonstrate leadership skills to advance interprofessional collaboration.
    • Display effective communication skills in the development of practice models that improve patient and population health outcomes.
  7. Apply the principles of clinical prevention and population health for improving the nation's health.
    • Analyze appropriate scientific data in the development and implementation of clinical prevention and population health.
    • Evaluate healthcare delivery models and population based programs that addressed health promotion/disease prevention, health status patterns and gaps in care.
  8. Advance nursing practice at the community level.
    • Demonstrate preparation for advanced nursing practice in an area of specialization within the larger domain of nursing.
    • Demonstrate advanced levels of clinical judgment, systems thinking and accountability in delivering evidence based care to a select population.
    • Sustain therapeutic relationships and partnerships with patients, populations and other professionals to deliver optimal care that promotes quality patient outcomes.

American Association of Colleges of Nursing (2006). Essentials of doctoral education for advanced nursing practice.  Washington DC: American Association of Colleges of Nursing.

Technical Standards for DNP Program

In preparation for advanced practice nursing roles, students are expected to demonstrate the ability to meet the demands of a professional nursing career. Certain functional abilities are essential for the delivery of safe, effective nursing care.

An applicant to the Doctor of Nursing Practice program must meet the following technical standards and maintain satisfactory demonstration of these standards for progression throughout the program. Students unable to meet these technical standards will not be able to complete the program. Students shall notify faculty of any change in their ability to meet technical standards. The technical standards include but are not necessarily limited to the following:

General Ability
The student is expected to possess functional use of the senses of vision, touch, hearing, and smell so that data received by the senses is integrated, analyzed and synthesized in a consistent and accurate manner. The student is expected to possess the ability to perceive pain, pressure, temperature, position, vibration, and movement in order to effectively evaluate patients. A student must be able to respond promptly to urgent situations.

Observational Ability
The student must have the ability to make accurate visual observations and interpret them in the context of clinical/laboratory activities and patient care experiences. The student must be able to document these observations accurately.

Communication Ability
The student must communicate effectively verbally and non-verbally to obtain information and explain that information to others. Each student must have the ability to read, write, comprehend and speak the English language to facilitate communication with patients, family members, and other members of the healthcare team. The student must be able to document and maintain accurate records, present information in a professional manner and provide patient instruction to effectively care for patients and their families.

Motor Ability
The student must be able to perform gross and fine motor movements with sufficient coordination needed to provide complete physical assessments and provide safe effective care for patients. The student is expected to have psychomotor skills necessary to perform or assist with procedures, treatments, administration of medications, and emergency interventions including CPR if necessary. The student must have sufficient levels of neuromuscular control and eye-to-hand coordination as well as possess the physical and mental stamina to meet the demands associated with extended periods of sitting, standing, moving, and physical exertion required for safe patient care. Students must be able to bend, squat, reach, kneel or balance. Clinical settings may require that students have the ability to carry and lift loads from the floor, from 12 inches from the floor, to shoulder height and overhead. The student must be able to occasionally lift 50 pounds, frequently lift 25 pounds, and constantly lift 10 pounds. The student is expected to be able to maintain consciousness and equilibrium and have the physical strength and stamina to perform satisfactorily in clinical settings.

Intellectual -Conceptual Ability
The student must have the ability to develop problem-solving skills essential to professional nursing practice. Problem solving skills include the ability to measure, calculate reason, analyze, and synthesize objective and subjective data, and to make decisions, in a timely manner that reflect thoughtful deliberation and sound clinical judgment. The student must demonstrate application of these skills and possess the ability to incorporate new information from peers, instructors, and the nursing and healthcare literature to formulate sound judgment to establish care plans and priorities in patient care activities.

Behavioral and Social Attributes
The student is expected to have the emotional stability required to exercise sound judgment, and complete assessment and intervention activities. Compassion, integrity, motivation, and concern for others are personal attributes required of those in the nursing program. The student must fully utilize intellectual capacities that facilitate prompt completion of all responsibilities in the classroom and clinical settings; the development of mature, sensitive, and effective relationships with patients and other members of the healthcare team. The ability to establish rapport and maintain interpersonal relationships with individuals, families, and groups from a variety of social, emotional, cultural and intellectual backgrounds is critical for practice as a nurse. Each student must be able to adapt to changing environments; display flexibility; accept and integrate constructive criticism given in the classroom and clinical settings; and effectively collaborate in the clinical setting with other members of the healthcare team.

Ability to Manage Stressful Situations
The student must be able to adapt to and function effectively in relation to stressful situations encountered in both the classroom and clinical settings, including emergency situations. Students will encounter multiple stressors while in the nursing program. These stressors may be (but are not limited to) personal, patient care/family, faculty/peer, and or program related.

Background Check/Drug Screening
Clinical facilities require that Nebraska Methodist College perform drug testing and background checks on all students before they are allowed to participate in clinical experiences. Therefore, students will be required to have a background check performed and submit to drug screening before being allowed into clinical practice.

DNP Frequently Asked Questions

What is the DNP?

The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) is a practice doctorate for nurses.  It represents the highest level of academic preparation for nursing practice (www.aacn.nche.edu/DNP/index.htm).

What is the difference between a PhD and a DNP?

The DNP curriculum emphasizes advanced nursing practice and building leaders in practice, education, and management whereas the PhD curriculum emphasizes the research process and dissemination of results.  Both DNP and PhD  graduates work together to shape nursing practice based on evidence based care.

Why is the DNP degree desired?

Nursing practice is influenced by the rapid expansion of knowledge, increased patient complexity, demands for quality of care and patient safety, and need for nursing personnel and faculty who have the highest level of educational preparation.  Graduates of DNP programs will function as nursing leaders that advance clinical practice to improve health systems and outcomes for diverse patients, patient groups, populations and communities.  DNP graduates will have the skills necessary to translate nursing research into practice.  The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) identifies the need for nursing education to meet the demands of an increasingly complex healthcare system and recommends the DNP as the terminal degree for advanced practice nurses.

What is an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN)?

According to the American Nurses Association (https://www.nursingworld.org/practice-policy/workforce/what-is-nursing/aprn/):

"APRNs include nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, nurse anesthetists, and nurse midwives, and all play a pivotal role in the future of healthcare. APRNs are often primary care providers and are at the forefront of providing preventive care services to the public.

APRNs treat and diagnose illnesses, advise the public on health issues, manage chronic disease, and engage in continuous education to remain ahead of any technological, methodological, or other developments in the field. APRNs hold at least a Master's degree, in addition to the initial nursing education and licensing required for all Registered Nurses (RNs)."

Will this program prepare me for any of the APRN roles?

The BSN to DNP program at Nebraska Methodist College graduates APRNs who are ready to function as Family Nurse Practitioners (FNP), Adult Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioners or Adult Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialists (AG-CNS).   

The APRN to DNP curriculum allows practicing advanced practice nurses to attain a terminal degree in nursing. 

Why choose a DNP over master’s level preparation?

Ongoing healthcare reform will increase the demand for quality and affordable care for all Americans.  This mandate will create a dramatic need for more primary care providers and the need for more APRNs is expected to escalate.  While many APRNs complete the requirements for advanced practice through a master's (MSN) program, the DNP program offers additional competencies related to organizational leadership, information systems, patient care technology, healthcare policy, interprofessional collaboration and clinical prevention for individuals and populations.

These additional competencies will better prepare the graduate to assume a primary role in meeting the healthcare needs across populations and communities. The DNP provides equity with other discipline's professional doctorate programs (Institute of Medicine, 2011).  The AACN position statement (2004) advocated the transition from specialty nursing practice at the master's level to the DNP.  The target goal for this transition is 2015. See the 2006 report from the DNP Roadmap Task Force (PDF Download).  

Institute of Medicine. (2011). The future of nursing: leading change, advancing health. Washington DC: National Academies Press.  The 2010 electronic version of this document may be retrieved online at http://thefutureofnursing.org/IOM-Report.

Is a dissertation required?

No. A hallmark of the practice doctorate is the completion of a scholarly Capstone project that demonstrates the synthesis of the DNP role through translational research within a population.  As part of the scholarly Capstone project, the student will prepare a manuscript describing the scholarly project and present the project findings.

The program is online, what does that mean?

The DNP program at Nebraska Methodist College will be completed using an online environment that has synchronous and asynchronous components.  Students will complete a large portion of the classwork in an asynchronous environment completing and submitting work online.  Synchronous meeting via a conferencing platform that allows for audio and videochat will be used throughout the semester.  These synchronous meetings will be scheduled for late afternoon/evening hours.

Will I ever have to come to campus? If so how often?

BSN to DNP candidates will be expected to come to campus three times during the program, APRN to DNP and Public Health Policy candidates will be expected to come to campus twice.  These campus visits will be over a weekend during the summer semester.

If the program is online, how will I complete my clinical hours?

Students in the BSN to DNP program will complete 1,080 preceptor-guided clinical hours throughout this program. Students will be asked to secure their own preceptors as they complete the program so that clinical may be completed in or near where students live or work. 

Students in the APRN to DNP program will complete 540 clinical hours through the Capstone coursework.

Students in the Public Health Policy track will complete 960 clinical hours through preceptor-guided experiences and through the scholarly Capstone project.

I already have a master’s degree in nursing? How will that affect my admission?

Students who already have a master's degree in nursing are eligible for admission.  Credit for previously completed courses will be examined on a case by case basis.  Students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours at Nebraska Methodist College to graduate with a DNP.

Are there special computer requirements for this program?

See the computer requirements here for the asynchronous components of the DNP program.  Computer capability to audio and videochat will be required for the asynchronous components of the DNP program. 

Will I be able to work full time while I am in the DNP program?

Students who wish to work while attending the DNP program are encouraged to take classes on a part time basis.  The rigors and time requirements of full-time attendance would limit the student ability to work.

Is your DNP program accredited?

Yes, the doctor of nursing practice degree at Nebraska Methodist College is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE). http://www.ccneaccreditation.org

What is the class size for the DNP program?

Class sizes range from 6-20 students.

How do I apply?

All BSN to DNP Tracks

To be considered for admission the following items must be submitted to the Admissions Office prior to the application date:

  • NursingCAS Application
  • Resume or curriculum vitae (CV)
  • Written statement
  • Official college transcripts from graduating institutions and official transcripts confirming completion of the required undergraduate courses
  • Interview with two NMC nursing faculty members using a standardized interview process and scoring method

Post-APRN Track

To be considered for admission the following items must be submitted to the Admissions Office prior to the application deadline:

  • Online Application
  • Current unencumbered licensure as a Registered Nurse at the time of applying
  • Resume or curriculum vitae (CV)
  • Written statement
  • Official college transcripts from graduating institutions and official transcripts confirming completion of the required graduate courses
  • Interview with two NMC nursing faculty members using a standardized interview process and scoring method

Public Health Policy Track

To be considered for admission the following items must be submitted to the Admissions Office prior to the application deadline:

  • Online Application
  • Current unencumbered licensure as a Registered Nurse at the time of applying
  • Resume or curriculum vitae (CV)
  • Written statement
  • Official college transcripts from graduating institutions
  • Interview with two NMC nursing faculty members using a standardized interview process and scoring method
Family Nurse Practitioner Degree Guide

Family Nurse Practitioner Degree Guide

Admissions Requirements, Example Plan of Study and More
Download the Guide