Traditional BSN Courses

The BSN Program is a 4-year all-inclusive program that requires a minimum of 127 credit hours. The curriculum is designed for students to complete their General Education courses alongside the 7 required semesters of Nursing courses. All students are required to complete specific coursework. This list should only be used as a curriculum guide. Course listings and required curriculum are subject to change. 

Included within this list is the Educated Citizen Core Curriculum. All students seeking to complete an undergraduate degree at Nebraska Methodist College must complete this set of Arts & Sciences requirements. As an educated citizen, NMC graduates are competent practitioners and respond productively to the complex dynamics of the world, utilizing a diversity of disciplines and perspectives.

First Year - First Semester

COM 101

ENGLISH COMPOSITION

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This course provides instruction and practice in writing, with emphasis on the recursive processes of generating, drafting, revising and editing. Students develop skills in producing and evaluating written communications in private and public contexts.

  • Credits: 3.0

PSY 101

INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

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This course offers students an engaging introduction to the essential topics in the field of psychology. Throughout this scientific study of human behavior and the mind, students will survey and gain insight into the history of the field of psychology, as well as explore current theories and issues in areas such as wellness, emotion, cognition, motivation, perception, consciousness, social and personality, and memory.

  • Credits: 3.0

BIO 225

HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I

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This course will introduce students to basic information required for further study and understanding of Anatomy and Physiology, as well as for the study of all healthcare related subjects.  Terminology that is specific to the medical field is introduced.  Basic principles of chemistry, physics, embryology, developmental biology and histology are reviewed/introduced in both the classroom and laboratory settings.  Students are introduced to the eleven body systems.  This course then focuses on enabling students to learn and understand the Anatomy (structure) and Physiology (function) of the Integumentary, the Nervous, the Skeletal, and the Muscular Systems.   Laboratory experience will include cadaveric study.

  • Credits: 4.0

First Year - Second Semester

HUM 150

THE WORLD OF IDEAS: CRITICAL REASONING AND RHETORIC

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There is a strong relationship between thinking clearly and expressing thoughts in formal writing and public speaking. Using the skills of logic and critical thinking, students will examine ideas, analyze and evaluate the arguments of others, and advocate for their own ideas. Students will be introduced to the NMC Portfolio process. HUM 150 is to be taken in the first semester, unless designated in the second semester by the program of study.

  • Credits: 3.0

BIO 226

HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II

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The structure and function of the special senses, along with the endocrine, circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems are stressed in this course. Laboratory experience will include cadaver study.

  • Credits: 4.0
  • Prerequisites:

    BIO 225

    Pre/Corequisites: CHE 100

COM 230/245 or 252

LANGUAGE & CULTURE IN HEALTHCARE OR CROSS CULTURAL SERVICE LEARNING

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LANGUAGE & CULTURE IN HEALTHCARE: Access to healthcare is greatly affected by one's command of language. Students in this course engage in the exploration of language and culture then apply these concepts to the healthcare environment through service-learning and community engagement. Students develop practical communication skills that enable effective cross-cultural work with health professionals and clients with backgrounds different from their own. This course lasts over the entire semester.

CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION IN HEALTHCARE: This one-credit course is designed for students who transfer in at least three credit hours of college-level sign language or international language coursework. Students engage with concepts of culturally competent care and effective cross-cultural communication for the optimal care of patients from diverse backgrounds.

  • Credits: 3.0/1.0

PSY 215

LIFESPAN DEVELOPMENT

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The Lifespan perspective involves several basic contentions: development is life-long, multidimensional, multi-directional, plastic, historically embedded, multi-disciplinary and contextual. Three imperative developmental issues are explored: maturation and experience, continuity and discontinuity and stability and change. Students study how humans develop and how they become who they are.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites:

    As determined by program

Second Year - First Semester

BIO 315

PATHOPHYSIOLOGY

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The course begins with a major focus on cellular functions and pathology, including inflammation, infection, immune response, metabolism, and fluid disequilibrium. These concepts serve as the foundation for the course as alterations in various bodily functions are examined. Alterations in body fluid and electrolyte homeostasis, fluid acid-base balance, gastrointestinal, urinary, respiratory, cardiac, endocrine, neurological, mobility and sensory-perceptual functions are emphasized.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites:

    CHE 100, BIO 226, BIO 280

SSC 235

THE SOCIOLOGY OF CULTURE

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This course explores the ways in which human beings make and remake the meaning of their social world through the production of culture. It employs sociological methods to explore the construction of the dominant, white subculture in the United States. The same methodologies are employed to examine the construction of subcultures in the United States, including those based on race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation.

  • Credits: 3.0

SCI 320

INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACOLOGY

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This course is designed to introduce students to pharmacological principles.  The various drug classifications and general characteristics of drugs within a class are examined.  The course also focuses on complete analysis of pharmacokinetics and drug interactions.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites:

    CHE 100, BIO 225, BIO 226

    Prerequisite/Corequisite: BIO 315

BIO 240

PRINCIPLES OF NUTRITION

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This course in nutrition is designed for students to gain knowledge of the basic elements of nutrition, the nutrient needs in all age groups, and client teaching.  Consideration of the cultural and psychological influences of nutrition emphasizes the psychosocial components of humans and adequate nutrition maintenance for health.  Students will have the opportunity to learn the role of good nutrition and how it applies to self, family, client, and the community.  It provides students with basic knowledge enabling them to gain an understanding of the integral role that nutrition plays in the health and well-being of others.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites:

    CHE 100

HUM 210/213

ETHICS COURSE

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Students must choose to take either:

HUM 210   INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS
Introduction to Ethics introduces students to theories and practices of individual, communal and societal obligations.  Moral inquiry in the course proceeds from a philosophical basis.

HUM 213   PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF ETHICS
This course introduces students to theories and practices of individual, communal and societal obligations. Moral inquiry in the course proceeds from a philosophical basis, with an emphasis on varied professional codes of ethics in healthcare disciplines. Students will explore codes of ethics and how they relate to traditional Western philosophies.

  • Credits: 3.0

Second Year - Second Semester

HUM ---

WORLD OF IDEAS: HUMANITIES ELECTIVE

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Students may choose a World of Ideas elective course. The course must be categorized within one of the following three sections:

  • The World of Ideas: Human Connection
  • The World of Ideas: Historical Perspectives
  • The World of Ideas: The Arts

See All Humanities Course Descriptions for specific course information.

  • Credits: 3.0

Third Year - First Semester

COM 320

HEALTHCARE COLLABORATION & LEADERSHIP

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This course applies leadership and management theories to the changing environment of healthcare. Students synthesize their knowledge of such topics as emotional intelligence, assertiveness, conflict management, gender dynamics, feedback delivery and systems theory in advanced writing and speaking projects. The NMC portfolio is integrated throughout this course. A complete portfolio (Levels I-III) is due by the end of the course.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: Determined by major

MAT 260

INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS

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This course is designed to introduce students to the methods used in organizing, summarizing, analyzing and interpreting quantitative information. Emphasis is placed on application of statistical methods and on the interpretation of statistically significant data.

  • Credits: 3.0

Third Year - Second Semester

HUM ---

WORLD OF IDEAS: HUMANITIES ELECTIVE

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Students may choose a World of Ideas elective course. The course must be categorized within one of the following three sections:

  • The World of Ideas: Human Connection
  • The World of Ideas: Historical Perspectives
  • The World of Ideas: The Arts

See All Humanities Course Descriptions for specific course information.

  • Credits: 3.0

SSC 370

RESEARCH METHODS

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This course is designed to assist the student in developing an understanding of the research process in qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods designs. The student learns to selectively apply the steps of research and to critically analyze research studies culminating in formal, oral and written projects.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: Determined by major

Fourth Year - First Semester

NRS ---

NON-CLINICAL ELECTIVE

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Student's choice of non-clinical elective.

See all non-clinical elective course descriptions in the course index.

  • Credits: 2.0

Fourth Year - Second Semester

SSC 465

CAPSTONE: THE EDUCATED CITIZEN

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This course is based in the social sciences and is designed to assist students in the integration of their roles as healthcare professionals and educated citizens. The focus of the class is on deepening students’ understanding of and facility with social and political systems that impact the health and wellbeing of the community.  Students demonstrate their preparation to act as educated citizens through the presentation of their portfolio within the context of this capstone course.

  • Credits: 3.0

NRS 402

NURSING ASSESSMENT FOR RN'S

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This course discusses theory and concepts of holistic health assessment across the lifespan. Advancement of skills in history taking, health assessment, and health promotion using concepts of evidence-based practice, critical thinking, genetics/genomics, quality and safety to provide caring, culturally-competent professional nursing care are emphasized. Students will collaborate with a preceptor to perform health assessments in a clinical setting.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: Placement: Admission to the RN to BSN Program or RN to MSN Program