Courses

The program requires a minimum of 80 credit hours. All students are required to complete specific coursework. This list should only be used as a curriculum guide. Course listings and required curriculum are subject to change. 

Included within this list is the Educated Citizen Core Curriculum. All students seeking to complete an undergraduate degree at Nebraska Methodist College must complete this set of Arts and Sciences requirements.

First Year - Fall Semester

COM 101

ENGLISH COMPOSITION

See Details

This course provides instruction and practice in writing, with emphasis on the recursive processes of generating, drafting, revising and editing. Students develop skills in producing and evaluating written communications in private and public contexts.

  • Credits: 3.0

SCI 105

ALGEBRA

See Details

This course is designed for students who need to review basic algebra skills. It covers topics including positive and negative real numbers, solving linear equations and their applications, integer exponents, operations with polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, graphing and equations of lines.

  • Credits: 3.0

SCI 116

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

See Details

This course will introduce students to terminology used in the health care professions. The origins of medical terms will be studied with an emphasis placed on understanding the suffixes, prefixes, combining forms and root words used in health care terminology. At the end of the course the student will be able to comfortably understand, translate and discuss issues related to their profession using appropriate terminology.

  • Credits: 1.0

SCI 200

HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY

See Details

his survey course stresses structure and function of the cell; the integumentary, skeletal, muscle and nervous systems; special senses, endocrine, circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive systems; as well as necessary aspects of medical terminology, chemistry, histology and embryology. Laboratory experience will include cadaver study.

  • Credits: 5.0

RAD 107

RADIOLOGY FUNDAMENTALS AND CLINICAL ASSESSMENT

See Details

This course introduces the field of radiology and basic skills required to perform duties in a patient care environment. Topics include patient care in the radiology department, vital signs, specific laboratory test, infection control, sterile procedures, and contrast media. The student will also be required to complete a CPR class in conjunction with this course.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: Program Admission

First Year - Spring Semester

HUM 150

THE WORLD OF IDEAS: CRITICAL REASONING AND RHETORIC

See Details

There is a strong relationship between thinking clearly and expressing thoughts in formal writing and public speaking.  Using the skills of logic and critical thinking, students will examine ideas, analyze and evaluate the arguments of others, and advocate for their own ideas.  Students will be introduced to the NMC Portfolio process.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites:

    HUM 150 is to be taken in the first semester, unless designated in the second semester by the program of study

SCI 206

PATHOPHYSIOLOGY/PHARMACOLOGY

See Details

This survey course begins with a major focus on cellular function and pathology, including inflammation, infection, immune response, metabolism, and fluid disequilibria. These concepts serve as the foundation for the course as alterations in various bodily functions are examined. Alterations in body fluid and electrolyte homeostasis; fluid acid/base balance; gastrointestinal, urinary, respiratory, cardiac, endocrine and neurological functions are emphasized. The student will be introduced to pharmacological principles of commonly used classes of medications. The various drug classifications and general characteristics of drugs within a class are examined. These characteristics include the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, side effects, adverse effects and drug interactions of common drugs within each class.

  • Credits: 4.0
  • Prerequisites: SCI 200

RAD 115

RADIOGRAPHIC IMAGING I

See Details

This course presents a foundation of knowledge regarding the creation and recording of radiographic images, including the factors that dictate the nature and outcomes of the process.  The student will understand photon interaction, visual perception of a radiograph, prime factors affecting radiographic quality, and the influence of body habitus and pathology in radiology.  This course introduces the student to the concepts associated with radiation protection for the patient, public, and personnel.  The student will examine analog film properties, beam restrictors, filters, intensifying screens, and grids.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: RAD 107

RAD 121

RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES/POSITIONING I

See Details

This course introduces the student to radiographic positions and procedures related to the thoracic cavity, abdominal, and appendicular skeleton. Radiographic procedures include chest, abdomen, upper extremity, shoulder girdle, and lower extremity. The relationship of anatomy, specific radiographic landmarks, patient care, universal precautions, radiographic critique/quality, and terminology to radiographic practice is discussed.

  • Credits: 2.0
  • Prerequisites: RAD 107

RAD 121L

RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES/POSITIONING I LAB

See Details

This course compliments RAD121 and demonstrates the practical application of radiographic positioning of the thoracic cavity, abdominal, and appendicular skeleton.  Students will critique radiographs for diagnostic quality, anatomy, positioning, and use of appropriate technical factors.

  • Credits: 2.0
  • Prerequisites: RAD 107

RAD 160

CLINICAL PRACTICUM I

See Details

This course provides an opportunity for the student to learn radiologic technology and related skills in a variety of clinical settings.  Students focus on the care and assessment of patients, drawing upon cognitive, affective, and psychomotor skills, while becoming acclimated to the clinical environment.  Both the observation and performance of medical imaging occurs under the supervision of a registered radiologic technologist. During this semester, students must attain identified competency levels.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: RAD 107

First Year - Summer Semester

RAD 122

RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES/POSITIONING II

See Details

This course introduces the student to the radiographic positions and procedures related to the pelvis, spinal column including sacrum and coccyx, and bony thorax.  The relationship of anatomy, specific radiographic landmarks, patient care, universal precautions, radiographic critique/quality, and terminology to radiographic practice is discussed.

  • Credits: 2.0
  • Prerequisites: RAD 121, RAD 121L

RAD 122L

RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES/POSITIONING II LAB

See Details

This course compliments RAD122 and demonstrates the practical application of radiographic positioning of the pelvis, spinal column, and bony thorax.  Students will critique radiographs for diagnostic quality, anatomy, positioning, and use of appropriate technical factors.

  • Credits: 1.0
  • Prerequisites: RAD 121/121L

RAD 140

RADIATION BIOLOGY & PROTECTION

See Details

This course emphasizes the effects of radiation on living systems and the principles of protection against that impact.  This course explores the effect of radiation on the human body, including cells, tissues, and the body as a whole.  There is a deep exploration of the biological reactions to radiation, including acute and chronic affects.  This course emphasizes the radiographer's responsibilities for ensuring radiation protection for patients, personnel, and the public.

  • Credits: 2.0
  • Prerequisites: RAD 115

RAD 162

CLINICAL PRACTICUM II

See Details

This course provides clinical experience geared to the attainment of designated competencies. The clinical learning process concentrates on imaging procedures applicable to the axial skeleton.  Student concentration on outcome assessment and their mastery of co-requisite radiographic positioning skills presented in RAD121/RAD121L continues during this clinical experience.

  • Credits: 2.0
  • Prerequisites: RAD 160

RAD 260

MEDICAL ETHICS & LAW

See Details

This course addresses a broad range of topics related to professional ethics and law including application of ethical principles, theories and models related to incidence and prevention of medical mistakes and state and federal laws that affect medical imaging.

  • Credits: 1.0
  • Prerequisites: RAD 107

Second Year - Fall Semester

SSC 235

THE SOCIOLOGY OF CULTURE

See Details

This course explores the ways in which human beings make and remake the meaning of their social world through the production of culture. It employs sociological methods to explore the construction of the dominant, white subculture in the United States. The same methodologies are employed to examine the construction of subcultures in the United States, including those based on race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation.

  • Credits: 3.0

RAD 165

RADIOGRAPHIC IMAGING II

See Details

This course presents information geared towards the analysis of actual radiographic images including the properties associated with density, contrast, film sensitometry, recorded detail, and distortion.  Students learn techniques for overcoming problems in evaluating images and come to appreciate the importance of minimum standards for imaging and the factors that can enhance or diminish image quality. The student will also emerge from the course with a solid understanding of radiographic, fluoroscopic, and tomographic equipment requirements and design. A comparison of analog to computed/digital radiographic systems will be compared along with factors that govern radiographic technique selection.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: RAD 115

RAD 210

RADIOGRAPHIC PATHOLOGY

See Details

This course introduces the student to the radiographic appearance of disease and clinical manifestations.  An overview is presented on all major body systems, including common radiographic pathologies identified in the profession.

  • Credits: 2.0
  • Prerequisites: SCI 200, SCI 206, RAD 121, RAD 121L, RAD 122, RAD 122L Co-requisites: RAD 220, RAD 220

RAD 220

RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES/POSITIONING III

See Details

This course introduces the student to the radiographic positions and procedures related to the digestive system, urinary/reproductive, and headwork to include skull, facial bones, and paranasal sinuses. The relationship of anatomy, specific radiographic landmarks, patient care, universal precautions, radiographic critique/quality, and terminology to radiographic practice is discussed. This course will also introduce students to proper venipuncture techniques.

  • Credits: 2.0
  • Prerequisites: RAD 122, RAD 122L

RAD 220L

RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES/POSITIONING III LAB

See Details

This course compliments RAD220 and demonstrates the practical application of radiographic positioning of the digestive system, urinary system, and radiographic headwork to include skull, facial bones, and paranasal sinuses. Students will critique radiographs for diagnostic quality, anatomy, positioning, and use of appropriate technical factors.

  

  • Credits: 1.0
  • Prerequisites: RAD 122, RAD 122L

RAD 261

CLINICAL PRACTICUM III

See Details

This course centers on the attainment of competencies that require higher levels of cognitive, affective, and psychomotor skills. Surgical radiographic procedures and fluoroscopy of physiological body systems are enhanced during this learning experience. Students gain a mastery of knowledge garnered from previous clinical assignments, focusing particularly on objective assessment of their acquired skill levels.

  • Credits: 4.0
  • Prerequisites: RAD 162

Second Year - Spring Semester

COM 230/245

LANGUAGE & CULTURE IN HEALTHCARE

See Details

COM 230        SPANISH
COM 245        SIGN LANGUAGE

Access to healthcare is greatly affected by one's command of language.  Students in this course engage in the exploration of language and culture then apply these concepts to the healthcare environment through service-learning and community engagement.  Students develop practical communication skills that enable effective cross-cultural work with health professionals and clients with backgrounds different from their own.

  • Credits: 3.0

HUM ---

WORLD OF IDEAS

See Details

Students may choose a World of Ideas elective course.

See All Humanities Course Descriptions for specific course information.

  • Credits: 3.0

SSC 101/215

PSYCHOLOGY ELECTIVE

See Details

SSC 101: INTRO TO PYSCHOLOGY

This course is designed to merge science with a broad human perspective and to engage both the mind and the heart. It sets forth the principles and processes of psychology and is sensitive to student's needs and interests. It helps students gain insight into the important phenomena in everyday life, to feel a sense of wonder about seemingly ordinary human processes and to see how psychology addresses issues that cross disciplines.

SSC 215 : LIFE-SPAN PSYCHOLOGY

The Life-Span perspective involves several basic contentions: development is life-long, multidimensional, multi-directional, plastic, historically embedded, multi-disciplinary and contextual. Three imperative developmental issues are explored: maturation and experience, continuity and discontinuity and stability and change. Students study how humans develop and how they become who they are.

  • Credits: 3.0

RAD 215

RADIOGRAPHIC IMAGING III

See Details

This course explores the natural process behind x-ray production. Topics include electrodynamics, magnetism, generators and motors, production and control of high voltage, x-ray circuitry, and the properties of x-rays. Course discussion will also include total quality management of a radiology department, exploring the theory and practice of quality assurance.  The use of department quality assurance test tools, interpretation or results, and management of a quality assurance program through record keeping is presented.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: RAD 165

RAD 262

APPLIED SECTIONAL ANATOMY & IMAGING

See Details

This course introduces the student to an understanding of the relationships of 3-dimensional anatomy to basic normal findings in Radiology, CT, and MRI. Radiology imaging related to the anatomical areas being covered each week will be highlighted in class but require student-directed and/or team-directed self study.  Working in small groups will promote a team approach to learning and development of problem solving skills to assist each other in acquiring the knowledge base necessary for application. This course will prepare the student for the application of anatomy to the clinical sciences and application of radiologic imaging toward diagnosis of clinical disorders, complimenting the Radiographic Pathology course.

  • Credits: 1.0
  • Prerequisites: RAD 121, RAD 121L, RAD 122, RAD 122L, RAD 220, RAD 220L

RAD 263

CLINICAL PRACTICUM IV

See Details

This course continues to center on student attainment of clinical competencies with various radiographic procedures. The student will continue to complete radiographic procedures under direct/indirect supervision of a radiologic technologist, while providing patient care and focusing on previous radiographic skills acquired.

  • Credits: 4.0
  • Prerequisites: RAD 261

Second Year - Summer Semester

COM 290

PORTFOLIO SYNTHESIS

See Details

This course is designed to prepare associate degree students for the required portfolio presentation they deliver in their final semester. Students will apply the reflective process to the goals of the Educated Citizen Core Curriculum in online assignments and in an in-person presentation. A complete portfolio, successful completion of the course, and successful presentation are required as the culminating assignment before graduation.

  • Credits: 0.0

RAD 265

CLINICAL PRACTICUM V

See Details

During this course of instruction, students attain completion of all clinical competencies as mandated by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (A.R.R.T.). Clinical attainment of radiographic procedures continues under direct/indirect supervision of a radiologic technologist, while providing patient care and focusing on previous radiographic skills acquired.  Students diversify their clinical knowledge as they explore additional learning opportunities in other advanced imaging modalities.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: RAD 263

RAD 270

RADIOGRAPHIC SEMINAR

See Details

This course is designed as a capstone learning experience for the student in preparation of sitting for the A.R.R.T. certification examination in radiography.  Students prepare for professional employment and continuous learning by integrating and synthesizing their professional knowledge, skills, and attitude. Students demonstrate competencies for professional employment at the entry-level and the capacity to pursue lifelong professional growth.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: Completion of all radiography professional coursework, excluding RAD 255 and RAD 222 taken concurrently.

RAD 280

PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY (CT)

See Details

This course presents the information necessary to the practice of Computed Tomography. This course includes information on patient education, patient positioning, patient assessment, radiation protection, contrast, positioning, imaging protocols, CT physics, instrumentation, and quality control. Cross-sectional anatomy and pathology will be briefly covered.

  • Credits: 2.0
  • Prerequisites: RAD 262