Course Index

Questions about courses, descriptions or credit hours should be directed to the Registrar's Office.

HPM 508 THEORIES & PRINCIPLES IN HEALTH PROMOTION

This course explores the cognitive and behavioral model/techniques of human learning, behavior change. The elements of a holistic lifestyle - incorporating social (work, leisure, family), physical (exercise, nutrition, etc.), intellectual (creativity, challenge), spiritual (meaning), and emotional (feelings) are addressed. Health promotion program planning in the three areas of exercise/physical activity, stress management and healthy eating/weight management are emphasized.

  • Credits: 3.0

HPM 505 STRATEGIC PLANNING

Effective strategic planning and management is vital to an organization's success and involves employees in every area of operation. Understanding the processes involved in strategic planning, including assessment, creating alliances/collaboration within and outside of the organization, synchronizing business planning with emerging trends, and using market research data to guide strategic planning are fundamental concepts addressed in this course.

  • Credits: 3.0

HUM 299 INDEPENDENT STUDY

Independent study allows students the opportunity to complete a course of study in an area that is of special interest. A maximum of six credit hours may be earned through independent study.

  • Credits: 1.0 - 6.0

HUM 298 DIRECTED STUDY

Directed study credit can be earned for professional and arts and sciences coursework. Directed study allows students the opportunity to complete a course of study when there is a deficiency in course requirements; it is determined by the Program Director of the department in which a student is majoring. Arts and sciences course work is determined by faculty responsible for each course and approved by the Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences.

  • Credits: 1.0 - 6.0

HUM 270-279 THE WORLD OF IDEAS: HUMAN CONNECTION

HUM 270-279

Students use the modes of inquiry unique to philosophy, religion, ecology, and anthropology to develop sensitivity to life's interconnections. Selected fields of study provide unique lenses through which to study inner connections among mind, body, and spirit, as well as connections between oneself and a world of ideas, perspectives, and both living and non-living things.

HUM 270        SPIRITUALITY/SOUL JOURNEYS

This course is designed to examine the spirituality and human well-being from many perspectives: theoretical, historical, philosophical, and psychological. Using the lens of stress management theory and holistic health practices, this course will reveal ageless wisdom, current research, practical skills, and vast resources to support mind/body/spirit well-being on life's journey. Major topics to be discussed include: coping strategies, relaxation techniques, the connection between stress and disease, stress and personality, and stress and emotions.

  • Credits: 3.0

HUM 271        EXPLORING WORLD RELIGIONS

In this course students begin to understand and appreciate the major themes, sacred text, ritual and symbols, cultural expressions and historical developments of six religious traditions. Through assigned readings, discussion groups, online research, field trips (optional) and video clips, students will begin to recognize the commonalities and differences among these religious traditions. This will also help to better understand some of the important religious issues that can lead to conflicts in the world today. This course is meant to help you understand these religions, rather than evaluate according to your own particular religious belief or culture.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: Determined by major

HUM 272        COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE

This course begins with a major focus on an introduction to the field of complementary and alternative medicine, discussing the history, characteristics, translation, and issues in alternative and integrative medicine. These concepts serve as a foundation for the course of descriptions in the development and key concepts of the most prevalent complementary and alternative therapies being used in the United States. In addition to providing comprehensive overviews of the traditional medicines of China, India, Africa and native America, this course takes broader approaches which have tremendous value in understanding the aspects of medical practice and healthcare that are compelled, or chosen, and those that represent true alternatives on a global basis. American medicine is an eclectic pursuit where a number of competing ideas and approaches thrive; the students taking this course must be willing to explore any ethical approaches or treatments that have been proven to work in their future professions.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: Determined by major

HUM 250-259 THE WORLD OF IDEAS: HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

HUM 250-259

Students critically analyze the impact of history on contemporary society.  Historical methods of inquiry inform students' perspectives on societal and institutional development. 

HUM 255        HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

This survey history course facilitates exploration of the history of Western Civilization from ancient times through the age of European exploration utilizing archaeology, works of fiction, news media, and secondary sources. The course provides opportunities for students to (1) employ creative means of exploring history, (2) become familiar with basic research skills and (3) hone creative and scholarly writing skills.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: Determined by major

HUM 256        THE HISTORY OF WESTERN MEDICINE

This survey course examines the history of the dominant form of medicine in the world: that which developed in Western Europe and America between 500 B.C.E. and the twentieth century. Among the various sciences, medicine stands apart. In its modern form, it is both science and art. The study of the history of medicine is more than a mere background to contemporary science: it serves as a platform for understanding how past cultures saw themselves and their place in the world. The history of medicine reflects changing cultural understandings of the world and the place of humanity within it. Medicine, or medical history, can also have a profound effect upon what we believe about nature and ourselves, influencing our art, literature, and philosophy. The majority of this course will deal with medical trends, treatments, and perspectives. These can strike us as both amusing and disturbing, but their greatest value lies in their power to prompt us to reexamine our own beliefs and assumptions.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: Determined by major

HUM 257        U.S. HISTORY: PAST, PRESENT, AND PROMISE: A SEARCH FOR THE TRUTH BY CHALLENGING THE PRESENT & DEMANDING A NEW FUTURE

Students in this survey course will explore the history of the United States from the first inhabitants of North America to 1870.  From these historical roots the course will explore 20th century conflicts including the current war in Afghanistan. Even though it will follow a political chronology it will focus on history as a dynamic process shaped by human expectations, difficult choices, and often surprising consequences. It will concentrate on the following themes: Global Relations, Constitutional Heritage, Citizenship and Democracy, Cultural and Geographic Diversity, and Social, Technological, and Economic Development. It will encourage students to think historically, to be reflective individuals, and to be active citizens seeking the truth as agents of change.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: Determined by major

HUM 258        WORLD HISTORY TO 1800

Students examine the formation of selected world civilizations up to the 18th century and relate challenges of those civilizations to the challenges humans face in the 21st century global community.  We examine how civilizations are formed and analyze forces that caused them to decline and transform.  We look at both the large picture of civilizations in an overview, and we examine lives of individuals who made significant impacts on their society and its future.  Historical methods of inquiry, including study of maps, artifacts, primary texts, and critical evaluations of secondary source interpretation, inform students' perspectives on societal and institutional development.  Most of all, this course provides students with opportunities to make personal connections with experiences of individuals in the past.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: Determined by major

HUM 259        HISTORY OF SCIENCE: THE CREATION OF A BIOMEDICAL WORLD

This is a course on the history of science, with an emphasis on the development of modern views toward biology, medicine, and how they have affected our views of human nature. In this course students will practice basic and advanced historical skills, and a large amount of in-class time will be spent on discussing and practicing the techniques that historians use to investigate and understand our world. Most of our time, we will explore the following questions: How and why have humans attempted to learn about the natural world, attempted to do science and medicine? How and why have those attempts changed over time? How have discoveries in science and medicine changed our social, cultural, and religious values? How have our social, cultural, and religious values changed our study of science and medicine?

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: Determined by major

HUM 220-229 THE WORLD OF IDEAS: THE ARTS

HUM 220-229

Students use artistic modes of inquiry to develop awareness of the diversity of human feeling and experience. Students use critical thinking as they respond orally and in writing to original artifacts of human expression, including works of art, fiction, poetry, drama, and music.

HUM 220        EXPERIENCING HUMANITIES: THE ART OF BEING HUMAN

"Who am I?" "Why am I here?" "Where am I going?" "What is the meaning of life, my life?" "I must die; how, when?" "How will I face it?" "And then what?" "What does it mean to be human?" These questions have been asked and answered over and over by our ancestors. The answers have not all been complete or satisfying, but amazingly similar and valuable. As the latest link in this long chain of humanity, we should know the answers of our past, and they will greatly aid us in forming our answers for the present and future. The study of the "humanities" is really a study of how we understand "humanity," as reflected in culture: art, music, literature, philosophy, history, drama, and film. This course is concerned particularly with the humanities in western cultural tradition, from Antiquity through to the present day. We will trace the march of western civilization and listen to (literature, philosophy, and music), and view (art, drama, and film) the greatest landmarks and study the creators and creations of the dominant ideas which continue to mold our minds and imaginations today. Through reading, listening, observing, thinking, discussing, presenting, and writing, students will gain a deeper understanding of the world we have inherited from the past, so that we may be wiser and more responsible participants and contributors in the complex interconnected worlds of the present and future.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: Determined by major

HUM 221        HUMANITIES INTERPRETATION

In this course, students study well-established and productive ways of responding to fiction, drama, and poetry, and they explore connections between literature and the arts. Considering connections with both art and music, students read, discuss, and respond in writing to "stories from around the world": literature written in many historical epochs and cultural settings. Students describe, explain, and experience universal human feelings as well as the perspectives of authors and fictional characters with uniquely different points of view. Students express ideas in various oral and written formats, including dramatic readings, class discussions, informal written critiques, classroom worksheets, and formal academic papers. Opportunities are given for more personal reflections for each student's "Educated Citizen" portfolio. These expressions are facilitated through not only a wide variety of readings, but also through supplemental videos, music, multimedia tools, and resources on the Internet.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: Determined by major

HUM 222        ENGAGING THE SHORT STORY

Reading and understanding literature allow us to make connections: to our communities, to each other, and to ourselves.  Through reading, writing, analysis, and discussion, we will engage the short story as a vehicle through which we can learn to create the connections we desire.  Drawing from the short works of literary masters, students will have the opportunity to experience different perspectives.  Through literary analysis, students will take those perspectives and discover what they mean and how they can impact the way they see the world.   This learning process will take place through online discussion forums, quizzes, and a variety of focused and exploratory writing assignments.   Additionally, opportunities are given for more personal "Educated Citizen" portfolio reflections.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: Determined by major

HUM 219 MEDICAL LAW AND ETHICS

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of medical laws, ethical principles and bioethics for the healthcare practitioner. The application of these fundamental principles will be applied using current medical-legal issues and bioethical dilemmas of today. The course is designed to improve the student’s ability to critically think and make sound decisions that are in alignment with professional ethics and values, integrity and judgment. The course will include such areas as confidentiality, privacy, consents, responsible practice, professionalism, bioethical dilemmas, and key legal aspects that influence the healthcare practitioner.

  • Credits: 3.0

HUM 213 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF ETHICS

This course introduces students to theories and practices of individual, communal and societal obligations. Moral inquiry in the course proceeds from a philosophical basis, with an emphasis on varied professional codes of ethics in healthcare disciplines. Students will explore codes of ethics and how they relate to traditional Western philosophies.

  • Credits: 3.0

HUM 210 INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS

Introduction to Ethics introduces students to theories and practices of individual, communal and societal obligations.  Moral inquiry in the course proceeds from a philosophical basis.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Prerequisites: Determined by major