Sophie Feng

Sophie Feng
Sophie Feng
PhD

Assistant Professor

Contact Information:

  • Phone: (402) 354-7054
  • Address
  • 720 N. 87th Street
  • Riley Leinart Center, Office 2086
  • Omaha, NE 68114

Education
MD, Benbu Medical College, China
MS, Wuhan University of Physical Education, China
PhD, Shanhai University of Physical Education, China

General Background
After graduating from medical college, Dr. Feng practiced cardiology for six years, and then reentered in the graduate school studying sports Medicine. She also holds M.S. in Sports Medicine. From 2002 to 2007, she completed her post-doctoral training at Creighton University. Dr. Feng was a co-PI of several grants, which most of them were from NIH. Her research examines pathological effects on cardiomyopathy and other elder diseases, effects of genetic modifications on the athletes' performance, along with the aspects of high frequency hearing loss by using molecular techniques.

Notable Publications/Presentations
David, Z.Z. He, Feng F (2003) Thyroid hormone is not necessary for the development of outer hair cell electromotility. Hearing Research 175:183-189

Fritzsch B, Muirhead K.A, Feng F, et al., (2005) Diffusion and imaging properties of three new lipophilic tracers, NeuroVueTM Maroon, NeuroVueTM Red and NeuroVueTM Green and their use for double and triple labeling of neuronal profile. Brain Research Bulletin 7050:1-10

Beisel KW, Sanchex S, Morris K, Feng F, et al., (2005) Differential expression of KCNQ4 in inner hair cells and sensory neurons is the basis of progressive high frequency hearing loss. J neuroscience 368:35-47

Feng F, et al., (2005) Smaller inner ear sensory epithelia in Neurog 1 null mice are related to earlier hair cell cycle exit. Development Dynamics 234: 633-650

Fritzsch B, Pauley S, Feng F, et al., (2006) The molecular and developmental basis of the evolution of the verbrate auditory system. International Journal of Comparative Psychology 19:1-24

Matei VA, Feng F, et al., (2006) Near-infrared laser illumination transforms the fluorescence absorbing X-Gal reaction product BCI into a transparent, yet brightly fluorescent substance. Jun 15; 70(1):33-43. Epub 2005 Dec 9. (The first two authors contributed equally to this work)

Feng F, et al., (2006) A disorganized innervation of the inner ear persists in the absence of ErbB2. J Neuroscience Apr 19; 129 (1): 20-25

Feng F, et al., (2007) Disruption of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 signaling results in defects in cellular differentiation, neuronal patterning, and hearing impairment. Dev Dyn. Jul; 236(7): 1905-17.

Feng F, Maklad A, Fritzsch B. (2009) Vestibular primary afferent pathways. Windhorst U, et al., eds. The Encyclopedia of Neuroscience. Springer Verlag, Heidelberg.

Professional Service/Recognition/Charitable Boards
Dr. Feng is a member of the Human Anatomy and Physiology Society. She has been awarded a Faculty Grant from Human anatomy and Physiology Society in 2012. She is a member of college Faculty Senate and Career Development Community.